Sick child

Should You Suck Mucus from Your Sick Child’s Nose? 7 Alternative Remedies that Work

by Muobo
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Should You Suck Mucus from Your Sick Child’s Nose

I was at an event sometime back where a mother was trying so unsuccessfully to pacify her cranky child. The sick child, who was visibly uncomfortable, refused to be quietened and continued screaming at the top of his lungs.

Another woman who could take the screams no more, took the child from it’s grateful mother and proceeded to suck mucus out of the child’s nose. That was the problem; the child had a blocked nose and couldn’t breathe.

The child became visibly better and the mother relieved, but I, the onlooker along with quite a number of people at the event, was slightly irritated, even though we all now had the calm we all craved.

It also didn’t matter that I had been pushed to the wall myself one time and had done the exact same thing for my daughter when she had blocked nostrils and couldn’t breathe properly. I could relate with what that stranger did for the baby, even if it wasn’t a pleasant sight to watch.

A child with blocked nostrils will be uncomfortable since they are too young to blow their nose by themselves and will struggle to breath in such cases.

It’s hard watching your sick child suffer when it’s within your capabilities to make them feel better and you will find yourself going out of your way to do so.

While this practice of sucking mucus out of a child’s nose will bring instant relief to the child, you should know that it also poses a lot of health risk to the child as well as you the mom (sucking out the catarrh).

sick child
sick child

Here are Some Facts You Should Know about Sucking Mucus from Your Child’s Nose

For the Child

Your child, like an adult, has a skin that lines his nostrils and underneath this are blood vessels. However, unlike an adult’s this skin is very fragile and subject to breakage if you apply too much force, which can lead to a nose bleed.

Read Also: 22 Fun and Interesting Facts About Babies

For You the Mother

Sucking catarrh out of your child is dangerous for you, even when you spit it out immediately and that’s because you never can be too sure you got all out. This places you at risk of an infection as some of the infection-causing organism left behind might find their way into your system to wreck havoc.

There’s also the fact that you will spend the next few hours being irritated and feeling like your mouth belongs to someone else.

So what are the alternatives for opening this blocked nostrils and getting this mucus out?

Should You Suck Mucus from Your Sick Child’s Nose

I was at an event sometime back where a mother was trying so unsuccessfully to pacify her cranky child. The sick child, who was visibly uncomfortable, refused to be quietened and continued screaming at the top of his lungs.

Another woman who could take the screams no more, took the child from it’s grateful mother and proceeded to suck mucus out of the child’s nose. That was the problem; the child had a blocked nose and couldn’t breathe.

The child became visibly better and the mother relieved, but I, the onlooker along with quite a number of people at the event, was slightly irritated, even though we all now had the calm we all craved. 

It also didn’t matter that I had been pushed to the wall myself one time and had done the exact same thing for my daughter when she had blocked nostrils and couldn't breathe properly. I could relate with what that stranger did for the baby, even if it wasn’t a pleasant sight to watch.

A child with blocked nostrils will be uncomfortable since they are too young to blow their nose by themselves and will struggle to breath in such cases.

It’s hard watching your child suffer when it’s within your capabilities to make them feel better and you will find yourself going out of your way to do so.

While this practice of sucking mucus out of a child's nose will bring instant relief to the child, you should know that it also poses a lot of health risk to the child as well as you the mom (sucking out the catarrh).

Here are Some Facts You Should Know about Sucking Mucus from Your Child’s Nose

For the Child

Your child, like an adult, has a skin that lines his nostrils and underneath this are blood vessels. However, unlike an adult’s this skin is very fragile and subject to breakage if you apply too much force, which can lead to a nose bleed.

For You the Mother

Sucking catarrh out of your child is dangerous for you, even when you spit it out immediately and that’s because you never can be too sure you got all out. This places you at risk of an infection as some of the infection-causing organism left behind might find their way into your system to wreck havoc.

There’s also the fact that you will spend the next few hours being irritated and feeling like your mouth belongs to someone else.

So what are the alternatives for opening this blocked nostrils and getting this mucus out?

7 Effective Remedies for Treating a Sick Child

There are tons of options you can adopt instead and some of these include:

Give Your Child a Steam Bath

Run a steam bath if your child is a baby or under a year and sit in the bathroom with her for 15 minutes. Alternatively, place a few drops of eucalyptus oil in bowl of hot water and let her inhale the steam.

Give Orange or Lemon Juice

If your child is three years or older, give orange juice as this contains a lot of vitamin c that will help fight off the bacteria that cause cold and catarrh.

An alternative to orange juice is strawberries which have been found to contain more vitamin c than orange juice.

Saline Drops

Put a few drops of saline drops into each nostril until the child is fine. This will decongest the nostrils, making breathing easy once again.

Sick child 3

Clean out the nose at intervals using cotton bud wrapped in a napkin. Do not use the cotton bud alone as the bud could dislodge and find its way to the lungs, leading to a lung infection.

Give Warm Liquid to Drink

Warm to slightly hot liquid like tea or soup have also been known to clear out blocked nostrils. The good thing with this remedy is that there is no overdose and you can give the child as often as he wants or needs it.

Keep the Child Hydrated

Stuffy nose or cold could lead to dehydration, making the child groggy and weak. When dehydration gets to 15% and above it could become fatal.

Give the Child Honey

Honey shouldn’t be given to children under one year as this could lead to botulism, a condition that is often fatal. However, it is effective for cold in older children, especially when the cold includes a sore throat and cough.

Give a teaspoon of honey two to three times daily as the antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of honey will help sooth the child.
sick child

7 Effective Remedies for Treating a Sick Child

There are tons of options you can adopt instead and some of these include:

Give Your Child a Steam Bath

Run a steam bath if your child is a baby or under a year and sit in the bathroom with her for 15 minutes. Alternatively, place a few drops of eucalyptus oil in bowl of hot water and let her inhale the steam.

Give Orange or Lemon Juice

If your child is three years or older, give orange juice as this contains a lot of vitamin c that will help fight off the bacteria that cause cold and catarrh.

An alternative to orange juice is strawberries which have been found to contain more vitamin c than orange juice.

Saline Drops

Put a few drops of saline drops into each nostril until the child is fine. This will decongest the nostrils, making breathing easy once again.

Clean out the nose at intervals using cotton bud wrapped in a napkin. Do not use the cotton bud alone as the bud could dislodge and find its way to the lungs, leading to a lung infection.

Give Warm Liquid to Drink

Warm to slightly hot liquid like tea or soup have also been known to clear out blocked nostrils. The good thing with this remedy is that there is no overdose and you can give the child as often as he wants or needs it.

Keep the Child Hydrated

Stuffy nose or cold could lead to dehydration, making the child groggy and weak. When dehydration gets to 15% and above it could become fatal.

Give the Child Honey

Honey shouldn’t be given to children under one year as this could lead to botulism, a condition that is often fatal. However, it is effective for cold in older children, especially when the cold includes a sore throat and cough.

Give a teaspoon of honey two to three times daily as the antimicrobial and antioxidant properties of honey will help sooth the child.

Tags: Babies, baby, crying baby, sick baby, natural remedies for sick babies

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